Archive for the ‘Narcotraficantes’ Tag

Take Care – Short Update on La Costa Michoacana.

Exactly one year ago, I wrote a post on the Michoacán coast. In this post, I extolled the wild beauty of the coast, its pristine beaches and lack of conventional tourist development. The coast has always had a reputation for danger – and it is still advisable not to travel at night – as there is a lot of narcotraficante activity in the area but generally it is believed to have got much safer in recent years.

In May last year, I wrote another post on the Coast based on the Mexican film ‘Amar a Morir’ which had just been released and which was set on the coast near La Ticla at the 180km mark.

Last summer a conflict surfaced over land between the indigenous communities of Santa María de Ostula, Coire and Pómaro and the townspeople of La Placita, around the 185 km mark on the main coastal highway. The situation rapidly became violent, tense and complicated. I wrote about this situation in my blog, but as my blog then became implicated in the conflict, I decided to withdraw the blog post, and the many comments it had generated, that related to the conflict.

One of the actions the indigenous people had taken was to block the main coast road at two strategic points heading south from La Placita. In this period of a few weeks whilst the road was blocked, two women – not Mexicans – were travelling north along the coast and suddenly, without warning, came across one of these road-blocks with armed men guarding it. Believing they were going to be robbed, they turned around and tried to escape back the way they had come from. Shots were fired at the car, aimed at the petrol tank as can be seen in the two photos, and the car was chased and eventually stopped. Fortunately no-one was seriously hurt but the experience was obviously very frightening for the two women

I am writing this now to warn people that the situation in this part of the coast has become tense again. It seems two regidores (elected officials) from the indigenous communities based in the Municipality of Aquila were kidnapped last week, and I was told that it was possible the coast road could be blocked again. I was due to attend an event on the coast last Saturday but because of the difficulties the event was postponed.

Whilst I don’t like to feed the idea that Mexico is a difficult, dangerous, violent place, it is best not to travel in this area whilst this situation persists and if you are have to travel along the coast take extreme care.

When I have more information, I will update this further.

More on the Costa Michoacana

barcos

Fishing boats at La Manzanillera, near El Faro

UPDATE: I WROTE THIS POST IN MAY 2009. SINCE LATE JUNE 2009, THERE HAS BEEN MUCH TENSION IN THE AREA JUST SOUTH OF LA PLACITA BEFORE REACHING LA FARO AND LA TICLA, WHICH AS OF WRITING THIS UPDATE IN MID SEPTEMBER 2009 HAS  LESSENED. I WOULD HOWEVER RECOMMEND THAT ANYONE WANTING TO TRAVEL ALONG THE COAST CHECKS THAT THE AREA IS SAFE.

Last night I went see the film “Amar a Morir” (loosely translated as love until death). Having suffered from all the cinemas in Mexico being closed for ten days or so in early May, because of the flu pandemic, and losing an estimated one million dollars, this film is now one of the top five earning films in Mexico, and the highest earning Mexican film. Continue reading

Some thoughts on Swine Flu and Mexico

benito-juarez

I had intended to make this next post “Ten Reasons to Fall in Love with Mexico”. The reasons are still valid, but, given the overwhelming media interest in swine flu, and, also, that a number of friends have written to me asking how I am and what is happening in Mexico, I have decided to write a post on this theme.

First, to say something about what is happening where I live in Ciudad Guzmán, in the South of Jalisco. As in everywhere else in Mexico, the schools, universities, theaters, discotheques, cinemas, gyms and anywhere where people might congregate in numbers over 20 are closed. In general, the atmosphere seems reasonably calm to me.

There is, though, a strange sense of suspension, of people waiting for things to return to ‘normal’. Continue reading

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